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Can I Become a Surrogate Mother if My Tubes Are Tied?

This is a very common question when it comes to gestational surrogacy. In fact, when I was just starting out my research into becoming a surrogate mother, this was the very first question I had.

I started to consider surrogacy five years after my last child was born. I had had a tubal ligation at her birth, and was under the mistaken impression that having my tubes tied was an automatic disqualification when it came to surrogacy.

Luckily, I could not have been more wrong. I have since delivered three children via surrogacy; twins and a singleton boy. So can women who have had their tubes tied become surrogates?

The short answer is yes, you can become a gestational carrier if you have had your tubes tied. But, unless you are willing to undergo surgery or an IVF procedure anyway, you cannot become a traditional surrogate mother if you have had a tubal ligation.

First, lets talk about the difference between gestational surrogacy and traditional surrogacy. Both are very common in the United States.

Gestational surrogacy is where the gestational carrier or surrogate mother will carry a baby she is not biologically related to. The eggs of the mother (or in some cases the eggs of an egg donor) and the sperm of the father are combined and implanted into the womb of the surrogate via an IVF procedure.

Since there is no biological connection to the child or children, there is no need for the surrogate mother’s ovaries to be a factor in the situation at all. A woman with her tubes tied can easily and without question become a gestational carrier.

With traditional surrogacy, a surrogate is donating her eggs to the process. She is impregnated via artificial insemination with the sperm of the intended father, and is the biological mother of the surrogate baby.

Since her eggs are needed with traditional surrogacy, it is very difficult to proceed with this type of surrogate arrangement for those who have had a tubal ligation. It would be very expensive and time consuming.

The best option for those who have had their tubes tied is unquestionably gestational surrogacy. In fact, agencies, clinics and intended parents prefer a gestational carrier who has previously had a tubal ligation.

Why? Because there is virtually no chance that the surrogate mother will unintentionally become pregnant with her own child while cycling to become pregnant via IVF with the intended parent’s child. Though rare, this does occur in some situations where surrogates who do not have their tubes tied break rules and regulations pertaining to embryo transfer.

So if you have had your tubes tied and are considering surrogacy, feel confident that not only will this not pose a problem, but you will be sought after as a gestational carrier.



Source by Rayven Perkins

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