T's Space

Don’t Feed That to Baby!

Not all grub that’s yummy for mummy is fair game for baby’s tummy. Think twice before offering these to your kids.

  • Popcorn – This delightful snack is reposted to be one of the most common choking hazards for kids. Parents must remember not to offer them unless Baby is supervised and over a year old. If given to babies over one year old, choose only the fluffy parts of the popcorn. Avoid the husks and unpopped kernels, which are sharp and can get stuck in the teeth and airway. Opt for plain over caramel or cheese-flavoured versions, because of the high sugar and salt content found in the latter.
  • Cakes with Honey – Honey should not be given to babies under one year old. That’s because the Clostridium botulinum spores can germinate in his digestive system and cause infant botulism, a rare but fatal illness. For the same reason, don;t give him cakes or bread baked with honey, because making alone may not totally destroy the spores. However, commercial foods that contain honey (such as baby food and breakfast cereals) are safe for your baby because they’ve been heated sufficiently to eradicate the spores.
  • Tiramisu – Because of the alcohol in it, babies and toddlers consuming the popular italian cakes. The dessert contains caffeine, which can cause stomach upsets, headaches and increased heart rate.
  • Bird’s Nest – Pricy as it may be, bird’s nest is and allergenic food that can cause symptoms such as vomiting, rashes and abdominal pains. This is especially so if other family members are allergic to the protein found in it. Only introducing this Chinese delicacy to your child only after he turns one. If your baby is healthy and has no allergy, bird’s nest can be consumed in small quantities as a tonic. It can sometimes provide relief for prolonged dry coughs.
  • Ginseng – The doting grandma may want to brew double-boiled ginseng soup for the family, but this is one herb you’ll want your baby to steer clear of, unless advised otherwise by a physician. Panax ginseng is unsafe for kids and can cause infant death as a result of intoxication. Some physicians may advice against eating particular types of ginseng when the baby suffers from qi deficiency. But even for healthy babies, long-term consumption is not recommended, as it may bring about early puberty.
  • Pearl Powder – When you were little, your mother may have lured you with the promise of radiant skin as she made you down a vial of it. Truth be told, the preparation of crushed pearls is not a health supplement. It’s a mineral that can be difficult for a baby’s digestive system to absorb. It should be consumed only under the advice of a physician, and is often reserved for treatment of more serious ailments like spasms or extremely high fevers. Children with G6PD deficiency must steer clear of it.
  • Sashimi – No matter how reputable the restaurant you’re dining at is, do not give this to babies under two, even in tiny amounts. In fact, raw food is forbidden territory for young ones because intestinal parasites present in it are nothing to sneeze at.
  • French Fries – Because they are high in saturated fat and loaded with salt, Charlotte frowns upon these for kids. But if Junior won’t stop pestering you for is happy meal at a fast food restaurant, you may introduce french fries and other fried foods in moderation after he turns one. This is also the age when you can start using oil while cooking his food.
  • Fizzy Drinks – You may be a fan of soft drinks, but before you empty the remainder of you soda into the sippy cup, think about your baby’s health and pearlie whites. The sugar and acidic content may also damage Baby’s emerging teeth. Dental concerns aside, carbonated drinks can also ruin your kid’s appetite for nutritious foods.
  • Runny Eggs – Crucial for cell growth and tissue repairs, eggs are known to be a wonderful source of protein. They are also rich in cholesterol and choline, which are both essential for brain development in the first three years of life. However, runny eggs should not be given to babies below one because of a risk of salmonella-related food poisoning. Cook the egg thoroughly until it is firm and there’s no trace of visible liquid egg. Then have Junior eat it immediately.
  • Ham – You shouldn’t add salt or sugar to Baby’s food until he turns one, so ham shouldn’t be permitted. There’s no added nutritional benefit in choosing ham over fresh meat. Besides, introducing flavoured foods (with high salt content) too early would encourage him to develop a preference for salty dishes.
  • Whole Nuts – These should be reserved for when your little one turns two. Otherwise they may pose a choking risk. Nuts need to be chewed well, but a baby’s molars are developed only after around 24 months. When Junior is ready for whole nuts, the dietician recommends healthier, unsalted, oven-baked varieties.



Source by Shirley Chin

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